ChangeCamp 2013 – interested in joining the organizing team?

Hi everyone,

The first 2013  conveners meeting will be at The Irish Heather (210 Carrall Street  Vancouver, BC V6B 2J2) on Wednesday November 7th at 5:30pm-7:00pm. We will provide the food and drinks that are needed to keep the ideas flowing!

Please RSVP to me if you can make it by emailing stevew@constructive.net

-steve

Child Care

Topic submitted by Tom for Vancouver ChangCamp 2011

Child care is at at the heart of Vancouver. Without loving child care that meets the needs of children and families, the city’s economy could not function and our children would neither survive nor thrive.

This goes beyond issues related to the provision of child care programs, such as expanding spaces at daycare centres and or supporting the provision of care through nannies and family child care providers. In fact, anyone who cares for a child is a child care worker. Most child care is actually unpaid work, as most care is provided by moms, dads, grandparents, neighbours, and friends. And this work is not only unpaid, but it’s also unrecognized and unsupported.

As members of the community, children depend on others to care for them. And as members of the community children also experience the same pressures faced by many adults in the city. This issues include sky-rockecting housing prices, longer and more tiresome commutes, a decline in social spending, increases in economic insecurity, and widening income inequality.

While most children may not recognize or directly face these pressures, children do feel the pressures in the form of less time with care providers, in the lack of quality child care options for families, in stress, in a lack of supports, and in missed educational experiences.

Child care as a city is about how we choose to relate to the youngest members of our community. A whole range of issues intersect with child care, from the future of the planet, to the realization of full potential through early education programs, to pressures and insecurities placed on families. Will we treat children as invisible and silenced members of our community, or recognize and respect children as equally worthy members of the community?

Additionally, child care connects with issues involving adults – especially in terms of gender equity and respect for workers. Lack of affordable, accessible and high quality child care creates barriers for women trying to make ends meet. The low-wage workforce of daycare providers, early childhood educators, nannies, and family care providers is almost entirely composed of immigrant women, who are excluded from economic opportunity in large part because the work they do is considered as “women’s work” and therefore not worthy of adequate or fair wages and resources.

So what are we, as city, prepared to do together with children? Are we prepared to recognize children as members of the community, to include and involve children in decisions that affect children’s lives? Are we prepared to prioritize children’s well-being? Are we going to provide supports for families and ensure that all child care workers are treated with the respect they deserve?

Vancouver ChangeCamp 2011

We’re back, baby! – RSVP now to secure your ticket

Session on telling untold stories at Vancouver ChangeCamp

Photo by Jenny Lee Silver

When: Saturday, November 26. 8:30 am – 4:30 pm
Where
: The Hive. 128 W Hastings #210, Vancouver BC.

Vancouver Changecamp is a unique event to learn, share and connect with change makers in the city. If you want to see change in yourself, your community or your city, Vancouver Changecamp is the place to start.

Vancouver ChangeCamp addresses the need for renewed relationships among citizens and government. We seek to create connections, knowledge, tools and policies to drive transparency, civic engagement and democratic empowerment.

This year the theme for Vancouver ChangeCamp 2011 is the upcoming civic elections November 19 for the City of Vancouver. This will mark the start of a 3 year mandate for the municipal government. This marks a great time to envision and act on the change you want to see.

Attendees at Changecamp are passionate about bringing about positive change. This year we are bringing together the most engaged changemakers from across Vancouver. You won’t want to miss this so register now!

Join us to

  • Learn: Get grounded in skills needed to make change, get practical advice and benefit from the experience of those in the community who have been trying this for a while
  • Share: Let everyone else in on your social change successes! Share your stories, your projects and your change.
  • Connect: Find a unique constellation of change agents, business people, non-profits, activists, government folks and most importantly, people with lived experience in the issues we all care about.

And if there is something you really want to talk about that’s not on the agenda, that’s great! Lead a session on your topic in the unconference. Unconferences provide the opportunity for participants to share their experiences, raise challenging questions or facilitate a conversation on topics generated on the fly. It’s an engaging, energizing, and sometimes chaotic, way to ensure everyone has a voice in the discussion.

If you have session ideas for Van ChangeCamp 2011, please comment here with your ideas or, alternatively, you may submit your proposals to vanchangecamp (at) gmail.com. Check out last year’s sessions for inspiration

If you are excited about the new ways that change is happening in the city, curious about how change will happen in the future, unsure about the pace of change or just want to celebrate the changes we have already put in place, please join us at Van ChangeCamp.

Why it matters

Why does technology matter?

  • Extends our reach – time and space
  • The audience is there, and people are talking
  • We can tell stories that spread
  • We can aggregate, sort and search input and information like never before
  • We can build community

Challenges

  • Digital divide is real – skills as well as access
  • Technology helps build buzz – but it’s true deliberative power is limited
  • Online engagement has to be carefully positioned – it has to make sense as a channel
  • Data and records management

Citizen Reporting: Where is it going? | ChangeCamp 2010

In the past, citizens have been an integral part of ensuring a well run society. This has included actively informing government and police services of issues through the use of direct verbal contact and phone (911 and 311). With recent developments in mobile technology enabling more extensive reporting (through the use of cameras, video and audio recording, and customized applications) we are seeing an explosion of citizen reporting tools for mobile devices. These are being developed by social enterprises, for-profit companies and cities themselves. What are the opportunities? Should there be limits? Should citizens be “policing”.
Proposed by Campbell Macdonald, Co-Founder Parking Mobility , campbell@parkingmobility.com